Cat / Esp / Eng
Esteu aquí: Inici Animac Magazine Suzie Templeton: The fascination of imperfection

Suzie Templeton: The fascination of imperfection

The animation narrative is more used to comedy than drama. Perhaps because it is more difficult to empathize with drawings or dolls, to suffer and feel with them, that laugh from the distance. Despite how difficult it can be to put ourselves in the shoes of a puppet, Suzie Templeton gets it. Her works grabs our guts to leave us overwhelmed.How does she do it? With a steady hand orchestrating all the elements that animation puts at her disposal. On the one hand, she clearly defines the tone of her stories, where the human relations have a major role. In Stanley (produced in Siaduc, 7 min, 1999), her first short film, develops a dramatic story of impossible love. The difficulty to assume the lost of a loved one is the subject of her second short, Dog (produced at the Royal College of Art, 6 min, 2001). Her third and last work, the short named Peter and the wolf (produced by Breakthru Films and Se-ma-for Studios, 30 min, 2006), is about overcoming your fears. On the other hand, Suzie creates hypnotic atmospheres, ideal for scripts. Those intangible environments, arrive in a subtle way to our senses, are the combination of very elaborated puppets, of hyperrealism design, embedded in extremely detailed decorations.

The animation narrative is more used to comedy than drama. Perhaps because it is more difficult to empathize with drawings or dolls, to suffer and feel with them, that laugh from the distance. Despite how difficult it can be to put ourselves in the shoes of a puppet, Suzie Templeton gets it. Her works grabs our guts to leave us overwhelmed.

 

foto3_suzietempleton_fotodaviddelval.jpg

How does she do it? With a steady hand orchestrating all the elements that animation puts at her disposal. On the one hand, she clearly defines the tone of her stories, where the human relations have a major role. In Stanley (produced in Siaduc, 7 min, 1999), her first short film, develops a dramatic story of impossible love. The difficulty to assume the lost of a loved one is the subject of her second short, Dog (produced at the Royal College of Art, 6 min, 2001). Her third and last work, the short named Peter and the wolf (produced by Breakthru Films and Se-ma-for Studios, 30 min, 2006), is about overcoming your fears. On the other hand, Suzie creates hypnotic atmospheres, ideal for scripts. Those intangible environments, arrive in a subtle way to our senses, are the combination of very elaborated puppets, of hyperrealism design, embedded in extremely detailed decorations.

That is when this complex universe comes to life before our eyes.

The author sends us with an exquisite animation, as if it was invisible and blends in the set, the beat of life of her characters. Through slight and gentle movements, and frame by frame, you can see how she blows soul to the immobile puppets. Templeton inherits the animated puppet tradition from Eastern Europe and condenses the emotions of her characters in a few facial expressions, with astonishing efficiency. At these faces with rough textures, watery eyes and delicate movements, empathy is served.

But why stop motion animation with puppets? Why not cartoon, for example? Suzie answers quickly: the imperfection captivated her attention. The irregularities of the textures that she builds send us a warmth and closeness difficult to achieve with other techniques. Precisely the unpredictability of manual processes and crafts, where the hazard makes each experience unique is the brand identity of the stop motion animation.

Piece by piece, Templeton has been defining her style. Although from her second short film, Dog, to her third, Pether and the Wolf, we could say she has practiced a somersault. She went from doing it all herself, screenwriting, directing, design, construction, animation, etc. to working with a large team, where, she says she stuck to writing and directing the short film. Had to give up to participating directly in all stages of production, and adapt to new work processes. She assumed, bit by bit, her part as director of the team. This change in dynamics had its advantages and disadvantages. The size of the project grew, something became possible with limited means something that is not feasible: thirty minutes of stop motion animation need a lot of money and energy, it ended rewarded with a deserved Oscar.

copy_of_peterandwolfstill20.jpg

However, there is one thing that Suzie missed during this production: to animate. While she explains it, she stares at an imaginary horizon; you can almost feel how she travels in time to land at a precise moment, when she stood in front of the doll. Templeton enjoys the concentration needed to animate, a process that she describes similar to a trance.

Suzie Templeton, in person, spreads a contagious passion. This past Sunday, March 4th, on the masterclass that she gave at the Old Cathedral, we had the opportunity to see why she was the star of the festival Animac. She explained the creative processes; she showed her puppets and it was all a revealing show perfect for discovering this magnificent director of stop motion animation.

dia4_ambientmasterclasssuzietempleton_fotodaviddelval.jpg

dia4_masterclasssuzietempleton_fotodaviddelval2.jpg

Meanwhile, we look forward to see her future works.

Irene Iborra
http://citoplasmas.com/


Facebook
Twitter
Flickr
YouTube
Vimeo
La Paeria - Ajuntament de Lleida

Subscriu-te a la NEWSLETTER ANIMAC!

Contacta

animac@animac.cat
Tel/Fax: +34 973 700 325